Monday, May 23, 2016

Risaldar Fateh Khan Khattak


Risalder Fateh Khan Khattak. Source:"The story of Guides" by G. J. Younghusband, published in 1908


Risaldar Fateh Khan Khattak belonged to the Khan Khel family of Jahangira (Nowshera district, KP). Initially he had served in the Irregular Cavalry Lancers of Sikh Regiment at Lahore. Later, he was transferred to the Corps of Guides by then British officers attached with the Khalsa Durbar. Fateh Khan Khattak was of very loyal service to the British and served them during first Anglo-Afghan War (1839-1842), Second Anglo-Sikh War (1848) and the War of Independence (1857).

After retirement, Risaldar Fateh Khan lived in the first floor of a building in the famous Qisa Khwani Bazaar at Peshawar. In 1883, one of his grass-cutter who used to bring fodder for his horses, picked up a brawl with his personal servant and used abusive language for him also. He shot the grass- cutter to death. He was arrested and locked up in Peshawar jail. Thomas P.Hughes, D.D, writes ;-
"Another Afghan friend, who came to an untimely end, was Fatteh Khan Khattak, a man of most distinguished bravery, and of very loyal service to the British Government. He had served the Government of India during the Afghan War of 1842, the Sikh Campaign of 1848, and the Indian Mutiny of 1857. He was a man of violent temper, a perfect desperado when excited; and one day he slew his servant. He was, of course, brought to justice and placed in the Peshawar jail. When I heard of my poor friend's misfortune I paid him a visit. There in the prison cell, I found my old friend Fatteh pacing to and fro like a caged tiger. "Padre Sahib," he said, "this altogether too bad, I have killed hundreds of men on account of the Government of India, and now that I have slain this miserable little cur, on my own account, I shall be hanged!" This was quite true; for forty years or more Fatteh Khan had been employed by the British Government for desperate deeds, and he was now sentenced to death for the killing of his servant. The sentence would have been commuted, but Fatteh Khan was found dead in his cell. He had probably acted on the example of Samundar Khan of Moneyri." ["Twenty Years on the Afghan Frontier",By Thomas P. Hughes, D. D, p-7]


No comments:

Post a Comment